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52. Schema: Trajectory

Does your baby like to repeatedly drop their food from the highchair, or throw things out of their buggy? Then they are exploring their trajectory schema; 

52. Schema: Trajectory

Does your baby like to repeatedly drop their food from the highchair, or throw things out of their buggy? Or does your toddler enjoy watching things swing from side to side (like a pendulum on a clock), blowing bubbles, playing catch or making paper airplanes? Then they are exploring their trajectory schema; studying the movement of an object, or their own body, through the air.

For the adult serving dinner, a baby’s joy in hurling their food on the floor is sometimes hard to share, but comfort can be found in the knowledge that your child is involved in important scientific exploration. Will it smash, will it splat? How long will it take to reach the ground? These early attempts at understanding and manipulating trajectory develop into the more familiar skills of throwing, catching and kicking, and eventually any movement with their limbs - even putting their hand up in class.

To support a trajectory schema, try swirling streamers or tie silks together and run along with them in a breeze. Blowing bubbles, flying kites and making paper airplanes are all fun and free ways to explore trajectory play. As they gain more control, throwing and catching a ball or beanbag, playing with a yo-yo and throwing things at a target (such as soft darts or a wet sponge) are all good trajectory games.

Explore other schemas:

May 01, 2016 By Alexis Ralphs

52. Schema: Trajectory

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