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54. Turn-taking Games

It’s worth investing some time in the games that require players to take turns (rather than, say, race to complete the task or work in teams). These sorts of games might be less energetic than a run around in the garden or less creative than a painting session. But the skills they foster have wide-reaching impact across so much of children’s  play.

54. Turn-taking Games

It’s worth investing some time in the games that require players to take turns (rather than, say, race to complete the task or work in teams). These sorts of games might be less energetic than a run around in the garden or less creative than a painting session. But the skills they foster have wide-reaching impact across so much of children’s  play.

 

‘Playing nicely’, being able to get along with other children and to empathise with their needs and feelings - these are the skills that will form the basis of meaningful friendship bonds and a harmonious experience at school. Grasping the idea of taking turns can also help with conversational skills, as children learn not to interrupt when someone else is talking and to listen to what others are saying. Patience and delaying gratification, waiting and responding when it’s time are all learnt and reinforced with games that work on turn-taking.


Turn-taking starts early, when a parent and child make faces and sounds to each other. Later on, make-believe tea-parties, cafes and shopping games, put the focus on good manners and social grace. Later still, old-fashioned board games are the best way to build a healthy attitude towards turn-taking.

May 01, 2016 By Alexis Ralphs

54. Turn-taking Games

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