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79. Being Read To

Stories help young children to make sense of the world. Without experiences of their own to draw on, stories act as signposts for the young mind, directing them along the right path and steering them away from danger.

79. Being Read To

Stories help young children to make sense of the world. Without experiences of their own to draw on, stories act as signposts for the young mind, directing them along the right path and steering them away from danger.

 

Classic nursery rhymes and old fairy tales are especially helpful, often featuring morally ambiguous characters, whose behaviour reflects the impulses that children must learn early on are socially unacceptable in real life. Think of Goldilocks, the little girl who breaks into someone’s house and steals food, or Jack, who steals gold coins from a giant and then chops down his beanstalk and kills him.

 

Listening to stories helps children understand how other people are thinking, they imagine themselves to be characters in the book and see others in the characters they hear about - thus developing their sense of empathy and ultimately the quality of their play and richness of their friendships.


Children who are read to also have a broader, more sophisticated vocabulary. Simply hearing all those words gives them a greater capital of literacy, when they come to write their own stories later on. There is no downside to reading stories to your children. Long or short, old or new, it is one of the most valuable things you can do as a parent and therefore one of the most important parts of the Essential 100.

May 01, 2016 By Alexis Ralphs

79. Being Read To

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